Freeze Frame: Gray Catbird, Caught In the Act

Photograph by Joel Sartore

Freeze Frame: Gray Catbird, Caught In the Act

A gray catbird makes a surprise appearance during a Baltimore oriole photo shoot. 

Photograph by Joel Sartore/Text by Julie Leibach
Published: July-August 2012

This gray catbird is a scene-stealer. Joel Sartore was photographing Baltimore orioles, including the one featured on our cover, when the silvery sneak swooped in to munch from feeders in the area. It was there for just the blink of an eye. "The orioles ran it off," says Sartore--but not before he snapped the photo. "That's a lucky picture."

The feathered interloper became one of several species that Sartore photographed for a series on migratory birds that also features American goldfinches, cliff swallows, and least terns, among others. He had a lofty goal: emulate the work of his favorite bird artist, John James Audubon. "He was such a great naturalist," says Sartore, "I wanted to try and pay homage to him." Sartore shot birds up close, against a backdrop representing their characteristic habitats. For Baltimore orioles, he needed an accommodating area at the forest's edge. A bit of sleuthing at a local birding store led him to a farm near his home in Nebraska. After securing permission from the owners, Sartore set up a camera connected to a radio trigger that he pulled from 50 yards away. He also used a "softbox" to subdue the flash and cast the birds in a more natural light. About 40 work hours later he had a winning oriole image--his favorite from the series--plus a bonus catbird.

The differences between the pictures capture the two types of photography Sartore likes best: images that convey a sense of mystery--the Baltimore oriole fixates on some unseen treasure below the frame--and those that snag climactic moments, like the fleeing catbird.

"It reminds me of why I love still photography," says Sartore, "because it freezes time," revealing details that the naked eye might miss, such as the fine contours of the plumage on the catbird's wing. "You just kind of look at the wonder of how this bird is built," he says. "There's not a feather to spare." Frozen in takeoff, this catbird is yet very much alive. 

 

SPECIFICATIONS

Photographer: Joel Sartore

Subject: Gray catbird

Where: Raymond, Nebraska

Camera: Nikon D3

Lens: Nikon 24-70 mm f/2.8 zoom

Exposure: 1/250th second at f/22; ISO 1250

 

Magazine Category

Author Profile

Julie Leibach

Julie Leibach is managing editor of ScienceFriday.com and a former Audubon senior editor. Follow her on Twitter: @JulieLeibach

Type: Author | From: Audubon Magazine

Comments

Dead Oriole on Audubon Cover

I am completely astonished by the cover of the July/August 2012 Audubon Magazine. That bird was not ALIVE when the photo was taken. If you doubt me, look at the other bird photos on the inside pages and compare. Have you ever seen an Oriole in that position? There is no life in its body or its eyes. It's embarrassing and shameful. Who vets these photos out? When I went to look at the photo on your web-site, lo and behold! There is a very staged looking Gray Catbird in the same shot. How amazing.

Background

I love the oriole photo, not just for the wonderful closeup, but especially the family of ducks in the background wandering down the road!!

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