Chasing Dragonflies and Damselflies

Chasing Dragonflies and Damselflies

Birding and butterflying have long been popular. With the advent of easy-to-use field guides and common, colorful names like neon skimmer and thornbush dasher, the pursuit of dragonflies and damselflies is finally taking off. 

By Jill U. Adams/Scans by Forrest L. Mitchell and James L. Lasswell
Published: July-August 2012
Magazine Category

Author Profile

Jill U. Adams

Freelance journalist Jill U. Adams has written for Discover, Nature, and the Los Angeles Times, among other outlets.

Type: Author | From: Audubon Magazine

Comments

nice article guy....good work

nice article guy....good work for you and your aticle very usefull for me

In order to get a good shot,

In order to get a good shot, focus on a specific twig or branch where they already landed. Wait with camera focused, they always return to the same twigs and only remain for a few seconds.
http://www.jambugile.com/

Audobon's "Chasing Dragons"

I work in an area in which I go from warehouse to warehouse making rounds. Picnic tables are outside near employee parking. About a mile away is a pond. I really don't know one dragonfly from another. But I noted on one high cloud "milky sun" day that swarms of these creatures, (many mating), were very much attracted to vehicles of certain colors. In fact they swarmed and sat on these vehicles for long periods of time. The colors were all metallic, and were dark gray, dark green, and dark blue. The colors probably imitated the pond's surface. Just an observation. Perhaps when one is "chasing dragons" in the reeds, another should be checking out parked automobiles for the rest of the dragons.

adirondack dragonflies

I would love to meet Mr. Cullen. I live in Cape May County, NJ, and have a rich portfolio of dragons here at the shore. I also spend two weeks each August in Indian Lake (rent a cottage on Adirondack Lake) and have a nice portfolio of dragons on the lake. Would love to meet other dragon enthusiasts while in the area. In 2013 we will be in Indian Lake beginning 8/3. Also, are there publications available for just the Adirondacks?

Photographing Dragon & Damselflies

In order to get a good shot, focus on a specific twig or branch where they already landed. Wait with camera focused, they always return to the same twigs and only remain for a few seconds.

Dragonflies

I've enjoyed shooting Dragonflies also for the last few years. A year ago, I was able to get sharp images of the body
and the wing of a dragonfly. When I enlarged the wing in my computer, I was amazed at what I saw. Both wings are geometric marvels. Take a look yourself on your own computer. You'll see row after row of triangles, squares and rectangles, as well as other four and five sided shapes. Enjoy!

Great Article

In my front garden, I have several long plant stakes which Damsel and Dragonflies use for perches. I have long been a fan of these graceful and beautiful Insects.
As a former colleague of Tom's I'm glad that he's still active as an educator and is spreading the word about these fascinating members of the world of Insects. Well done.....!

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