Peter Matthiessen

Peter Matthiessen

Articles by this Author

Published: July-August 1995

A journey to Japan to see the world's largest cranes.

Published: 06/25/2014

At the turn of this century, by general estimate, 100,000 tigers shambled over a vast range of Asia extending from southern India to the Siberian taiga and from the equatorial tropics of Java and Bali to the Transcaucasus and eastern Turkey. By 1950 one authority was already predicting that "the species is now on its way to extinction"; three years from now, when the present century ends, perhaps no more than 2,500 scattered individuals of Panthera tigris will still wander a few isolated regions of their former range.

Published: 06/25/2014

This story originally appeared in the March-April 1994 issue.

Published: 06/25/2014

This story originally appeared in the September-October 1999 issue.

The ship sails from Ushuaia, Argentina, at 6 p.m., due east down the Beagle Channel. To the north and south, the mountains of Tierra del Fuego are dark, forested, forbidding, showing no light or other sign of habitation. Already, a soft swell tries the bow, and a gray-headed albatross planes away across the rolling wake. Next, a black-browed albatross appears out of the east, where high dark coasts open on the ocean horizon and the last sun ray glints on the windy seas of Drake Passage.

Published: 06/25/2014

The following story is a fictional account of Guy Bradley's murder written in the language of the time. It is told by Gene Roberts, who discovered the body, to Lucius Watson, whose father, Ed, was blamed for this and other murders in south Florida. "The Killing" is excerpted from the novel Bone by Bone, the third novel in Peter Matthiessen's Watson Trilogy, which began with Killing Mr. Watson (1993) and Lost Man's River (1997).

Published: 06/25/2014

In the late autumn of 1950, small flocks of migrating red-crowned and white-naped cranes were flared from their winter feeding grounds in the border region between North and South Korea by immense and scaring bursts of light and noise. The War of June 25, as the South Koreans called it—after the date when North Korea invaded the South through the Panmunjom Valley—was well under way, in all its uproar of explosives and artillery.