Birds

Birds

Neil Hayward spent most of 2013 crisscrossing the continent on a quest to see as many bird species as he could in a calendar year. When it was all over, he'd seen more than anyone-ever-and broken the Big Year record.

Birds

Green Heron numbers seem to be declining in recent years, and no one is sure just why. Now a trove of nests uncovered in a Louisiana marsh could help scientists solve the mystery.

Birds

Of canvases and Canvasbacks: a look inside the high-stakes, duck-obsessed world of the Federal Duck Stamp Contest.

Birds

Gannets are the bird world's Olympians, capable of plunging a hundred feet through the air, then slicing through the ocean to chase down fish. 

Birds

Reimagining John James Audubon's "Birds of North America."

Birds

Robins may make the work look easy, but in human terms it's one monumental project.

Audubon Magazine

How to Find Owls: A Crash Course in Montana

An amateur birder learns how to locate owls, using scientific techniques. 
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Audubon's Legacy: Where It All Began

On a farm in rural Pennsylvania, John James Audubon first glimpsed the curious birds of the New World that would become his lifelong passion. Now the Audubon Center at Mill Grove shares his home and his artistry with the conservation movement he continues to inspire.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

One Man Sets Out to Make El Salvador a Birding Destination

One overlooked Central American country could draw birders with the help of an avian crusader.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Controlling Pests With Birds

Birds provide valuable ecosystem services, defending crops, such as grapes and coffee, from insects.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

When Punk Rock, Tattoos, and Birding Collide

Paul Riss is shattering the mold, proving that birdwatchers can come in all styles. 
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Parrot Conservation Changes a Catholic Tradition

Fifteen years ago the yellow-eared parrot was presumed extinct. Its rediscovery in Colombia forced the Catholic Church to abandon an age-old tradition, and brought about one of the most amazing comebacks in the Americas. 
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
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