Conservation

Audubon Magazine

Beavers' Comeback Helps Restore Ecosystems

Long maligned as pests, beavers are proving indispensable.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Social Networking Could Help Save Amphibians

Harnessing the Facebook generation’s photo-sharing habits could help track amphibians around the world.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

World's Largest Bat Colony Benefits Birds and Farms

The bats in Texas's Bracken Cave are effective insecticides. Preserving the land where they live helps other wildlife, too.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Adventurers Contribute to Science

A nonprofit pairs researchers with extreme athletes.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

A Big Win for Minnesota's Wetlands

A surge of funds for restoring Minnesota’s wetlands.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Whale of a Miracle

The race to free three gray whales trapped in Arctic sea ice.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Wake up, BP, and Restore Wyoming’s Soda Lake

The last thing that the nation’s most maligned oil company needs is another black eye. So it remains a mystery why, after being such a good neighbor for so long, it refuses to honor its pledge to maintain one of the most important waterfowl, wading bird, and shorebird habitats on the Central Flyway.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

All's Whale: Actress Kristen Bell Discusses Her New Movie

Kristen Bell mixes celebrity with activism.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

The Shore Is Their Oyster

A fertile estuary in northern California could lose full wilderness status to an oyster company poised to extend its commercial activity for another decade.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

The Big, Bad Wolf?

Gray wolves are coming back in France, much to citizens’ delight, if not shepherds. 
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Fresh Start

A makeover turns manmade Aramburu Island into rich wildlife habitat.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

The Other Arctic

When most Americans think of the wildlife on Alaska’s North Slope, they think of the beleaguered, 19-million-acre Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. But if they look to the west, they will see another vast wilderness—also teeming with birds, bears, and caribou. Best of all, they can help save it.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Life Support

The news for Lake Okeechobee, the Everglades’ lungs and kidneys, is mixed at best. But at last we understand what’s at stake and how to heal the lake.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Safety Net

There are only 245 vaquita left in the wild. To save the rare porpoises, the Mexican government has launched an innovative project that pays fishermen to hang up their nets.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Bayou Blues

Musician Tab Benoit plays to save Louisiana’s wetlands.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Dredge Work

Audubon's Louisiana Coastal Initiative is helping to restore marshlands at the Rainey Sanctuary, one patch at a time.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Here Comes the Sun

Our southwest’s deserts offer promise for solar power development. They also boast incredible biodiversity. New initiatives are looking to tap into the vast energy potential without threatening the wildlife and plants that depend on this fragile landscape.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Gone Fish

Personal conservation is great, and the better seafood guides can be helpful, says our Incite columnist, an independent voice for the environment. But fisheries policy must still be changed.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Saddle Sores

Feral horses are out of control in the American West, laying waste to vast tracts of wildlife habitat and imperiling native species. What’s worse, the public seems determined to keep it that way.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

The Enchanted Forest

An ancient cypress swamp thrives in the heart of South Carolina’s Low Country, spared from encroaching urban sprawl by a sweet-talking forest guardian and visitors’ goodwill.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Volunteer Army

When the Gulf oil spill threatened birds and beaches, tens of thousands of citizens signed up to lend a hand. Five months later, they’re still working hard.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Shock Troops

In Oregon’s deep backcountry, a group of rugged environmentalists fight for some of the nation’s oldest forests.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Shangri-La

An hour from the smog and concrete of Los Angeles, a quarter-million-acre oasis, bursting with rare and unusual species, is waiting to be discovered.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

The Long View

Isle Royale National Park draws visitors who like nature rugged and remote. It’s also the site of the longest-running study ever of a predator and its primary prey—even as global warming shows signs of upsetting the natural balance.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Gold Standard

When it comes to protecting natural havens for bird species, shade-grown-coffee farms are second only to virgin forest. A writer’s journey through Nicaragua illustrates just how key coffee farms can be for the well-being of a certain warbler.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Let’s Make a Deal

With a signature and a handshake, an innovative legal tool is allaying private landowners’ fears of one of the nation’s most powerful environmental laws to create critical wildlife habitat.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine