Birds

Hunting Season for White Pelicans?

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Books and Birds

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Bird-Watching Bust

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Review: Humans, Nature, and Birds

A virtual gallery of birds in art from cave walls to computer screens
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

CBC Goes HD

Rangers in California use a HD camera for the Christmas Bird Count
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Tough Duck

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Odd Behavior: Young Ravens Don

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Watch Out: The Eagles Are Here

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

A Storm of Snowy Owls

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Internet Crows Cracked Nuts Two Centuries Ago

An email with a link to a sensational web video buzzed around the Audubon magazine office last week. The clip featured crows in Japan dropping nuts into a busy intersection, waiting for them to be crushed by cars, then retrieving the bits. Some editors were skeptical and I was assigned to investigate. What I found is fascinating; what is now known as “avian prey-dropping behavior” was first documented by a 19th century London banker-turned-ornithologist named Howard Saunders.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

An Urban Birder

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Airports Order Up Bird Radars

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

A Suitcase Full of Puffins

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

My Own Close Call Over the Hudson

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Obama tourists swarm a land of disappearing forest birds

“I am Obama’s brother!” a stranger shouted to me through the open window of a matatu (small bus) as I was crossing the lush countryside of western Kenya. That was 2006. According to a New York Times article this week, cars in western Kenya “now sport bumper stickers with statements like ‘Obama, first cousin.’” Kenya has claimed America’s president-elect as its own, and the badge is revitalizing tourism, which plummeted following the gruesome riots during the country’s elections last December. Kogelo, the village where Obama’s father grew up, has become a hot ticket on Kenya’s tourist trail, according to the Times article. But there is another reason to visit the region: Kakamega Rainforest. Home to more than 400 species of birds and five types of monkeys, Kakamega is a bite-sized remnant of the vast tropical forest that once spanned the waist of Africa. The forest is being chipped away, but two guru birders aim to save it.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

The 100th Staten Island Christmas Bird Count

I do it because it is a ritual and a ritual is something you just do.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Goose Eggs May Sustain Some Polar Bears

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Christmas Bird Countdown!

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

The Spirit Bird

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Wild Monks

Sometime around 1970, a crate, or perhaps it was a cage, shipped from somewhere in South America, landed at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City. Inside were monk parakeets, bright green birds native to the savannahs and scrubland of Paraguay and Argentina. Mobsters may have popped the lid to inspect the goods, expecting fine wine or rare art, a baggage handler could have dropped the cargo, or the container may have been cracked or broken to begin with, no one knows for sure. But somehow the parakeets got out, and in certain communities they continue to cause a fracas.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

A-Birding in a Beach Chair

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine