Books

Audubon Magazine

2014 Audubon Holiday Gift Guide

Last-minute picks for nature lovers of all ages.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Jon Reis

subirdia

Credit: Tamara Staples

White Showgirl Bantam Cockerel

Photography by Robert Wright

Bees are Droege's most recent obsession. In his lab, a general-purpose sink doubles as a bug-washing station.

Photography by Robert Wright

In Sam Droege 's lab at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, pizza box provide storage to thousands of pinned bee specimens. Volunteers Gene Scarpulla (in green) and Tim McMahon peer through microscopes to ID the insects. 

Photograph by Tamara Staples

Silver Duckwing Modern Game Large Fowl Hen

This chicken doesn’t just look tough—it was actually bred for fighting, as its name suggests. The practice of cock fighting has since been outlawed in the U.S.

 

Photograph by Tamara Staples

White Showgirl Bantam Cockerel

Cross a naked neck breed and a silky breed, and you get a very bizarre looking chicken. Notice the bright blue flap of skin on the side of his face highlighting his earlobe.

Photograph by Tamara Staples

Salmon Faverolles Bantam Cockerel

Blanketed in a striking patchwork of plumes, Salmon Faverolles Bantam Cockerels look almost nothing like their female counterparts. These chickens are also known for being hardy meat and egg producers.

Photograph by Tamara Staples

Self Blue Belgian Bearded Danver Cockerel

 A particularly petite breed, this chicken weighs only about 26 ounces and wears an unusually shaped comb, called a rose comb, on its face.

 

Photograph by Tamara Staples

Cream Brabanter Bantam Cock

An uncommon breed in the U.S., the Cream Brabanter Bantam has Dutch origins and can be recognized by its distinctive V-shaped crown.

Photograph by Tamara Staples

Blue Cochin Bantam Pullet

First introduced to England from China as a gift to Queen Victoria, the matronly-looking Blue Cochin looks like it’s sporting a sort of bustle. Staples thinks this aesthetic may have contributed to the bird’s popularity in Victorian England.

Photograph by Tamara Staples

Bearded Buff Frizzle Polish Bantam Hen

This “little bearded lady,” as Staples calls her, owes her frizzled feathers to a particular genetic mutation that causes its plumes to curl from front to back.

Photograph by Tamara Staples

Araucana Large Fowl Cockerel

Known for their stunning blue and green eggs, this breed has a uniquely stumpy physique because it has three fewer vertebrae in its spine than a normal chicken.

Photograph by Tamara Staples
Audubon Magazine

Excerpt: Welcome to Subirdia

Writer John Marzluff explains how golf courses can be bird-friendly, as well as birdie-friendly. 
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Audubon Magazine

Win a Copy: "The Birds of Pandemonium"

Read an excerpt from Michele Raffin's new book about running a home for abandoned birds.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Courtesy of: Henry Holt and Co; Riverhead Books; University Of Chicago Press (2); Princeton University Press; Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.
Courtesy of Penguin Group USA
Painting by Rubens Peale/Wikimedia Commons
Audubon Magazine

Book Review: An Ocean Garden: The Secret Life of Seaweed

Vibrant portraits reveal the beautiful, diverse world of marine flora.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine
Photograph by Suzanne DeChillo/The New York Times/Redux
Courtesy of Henry Holt and Co.
Courtesy of Henry Holt and Co.
Courtesy of St. Martin's Press
Photograph by Dan Fagre