Magazine Blog

Obama tourists swarm a land of disappearing forest birds

“I am Obama’s brother!” a stranger shouted to me through the open window of a matatu (small bus) as I was crossing the lush countryside of western Kenya. That was 2006. According to a New York Times article this week, cars in western Kenya “now sport bumper stickers with statements like ‘Obama, first cousin.’” Kenya has claimed America’s president-elect as its own, and the badge is revitalizing tourism, which plummeted following the gruesome riots during the country’s elections last December. Kogelo, the village where Obama’s father grew up, has become a hot ticket on Kenya’s tourist trail, according to the Times article. But there is another reason to visit the region: Kakamega Rainforest. Home to more than 400 species of birds and five types of monkeys, Kakamega is a bite-sized remnant of the vast tropical forest that once spanned the waist of Africa. The forest is being chipped away, but two guru birders aim to save it.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Paradise Lost

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Journey to Uganda

Weighing life's dangers
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

The 100th Staten Island Christmas Bird Count

I do it because it is a ritual and a ritual is something you just do.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Goose Eggs May Sustain Some Polar Bears

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Caroling Coyotes

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Forever (Almost) Amber

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

New Climate Change Report: The sky isn

A new report on abrupt climate change doesn’t necessarily say the sky is falling but portrays a complex world that it is clearly undergoing great change. Some change has been wrought by humans and some seems unrelated to our presence on the planet. The Southwest may be drying up, although we didn’t necessarily do it. Greenland and Antarctica are melting; we didn’t necessarily do it but we are certainly contributing. Warm, salty currents in the Atlantic Ocean that circulate heat probably won’t collapse this century, but they could. And the catastrophic methane release some scientists have predicted is unlikely to happen anytime soon, but methane, a greenhouse gas significantly more potent than carbon dioxide, will surely continue to increase in the atmosphere.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Let it Snow!

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Christmas Bird Countdown!

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Mercury in Fish: An Agency Conflicted

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Uncovering How Wildlife Corridors Work

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

The Holidays: Green 'Em Up

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Poznan Poses Many Problems

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

India: Tiger

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

The Spirit Bird

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Climate Watch: Get Ready to Enlist

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Save Farmland: Yes, You Can

Have Your Own Story? We would love to hear what you, your neighbors, or your town are doing to save farmland and open space. Post a comment below and tell us about your experiences.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Pondering Pecans

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Australia: Beautiful and Bizarre

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Wild Monks

Sometime around 1970, a crate, or perhaps it was a cage, shipped from somewhere in South America, landed at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City. Inside were monk parakeets, bright green birds native to the savannahs and scrubland of Paraguay and Argentina. Mobsters may have popped the lid to inspect the goods, expecting fine wine or rare art, a baggage handler could have dropped the cargo, or the container may have been cracked or broken to begin with, no one knows for sure. But somehow the parakeets got out, and in certain communities they continue to cause a fracas.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

New Zealand: Fiordland

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

A-Birding in a Beach Chair

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Turkey Lore, Emus No More

An English turkey breeder named Jesse Throssel brought birds that were so meaty they had trouble mating naturally to the Portland International Livestock Show around 1930. Throssel’s turkeys, called broad breasted bronzes, were a hit. In the 1950s they were bred with white hollands to create a breed called the broad breasted white, which had a creamier skin tone. Reared for maximum breast meat, broad breasted whites became so popular that breeds such as the Narragansett, Bourbon Red and Jersey Buff were nearly driven to extinction.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

Sheryl Crow Song Is a Gas

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

BLM: "Oil Shale Rules Don't Change the Environment"

The Bureau of Land Management moves forward with regulation for oil shale leasing on public land.
Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine

New Regs to Keep Drugs Out of Waterways

Type: Magazine_article | From: Audubon Magazine