Alaska

Gerrit Vyn, Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Spectacled Eiders, an Alaska WatchList species, nest near Teshekpuk Lake in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska.

Map of Important Bird Areas of Alaska.

Sean Mcallister
Melanie Smith scans for murrelets on the MV Sierra.

Chapter 1: The Tongass National Forest

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Uploaded by on Dec 15, 2009.

Where Cold is Hot: A Murrelet's Eye View of Glacier Bay

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Matt Kirchhoff, Director of Bird Conservation for Audubon Alaska, describes the unusual life history of Southeast Alaskas signature seabirds -- the Marbled Murrelet and the Kittlitzs Murrelet.

David Policansky, National Research Council
Participants at the 2009 Tongass Science Conference.
John Schoen

Brown Bear Cubs at Tongass National Forest.

S Morrell, USFWS

Flock of Shearwaters at Unimak Pass.

Satellite view of Teshekpuk Lake

Teshekpuk Lake: Arctic Nursery

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Teshekpuk Lake is located on the North Slope of Alaska and is one of the most ecologically important wetlands in the entire Arctic.

LizLabunski, USFWS

Bearded Seal

MiloBurcham

Midnight Sun on the Chukchi Sea

Bowhead Whale 2010

Melanie Smith

Place Based Summary

John Schoen
South Prince of Wales Island, Tongass National Forest
Jim Shear

Julie and Bart Koehler

Subhankar Banerjee

A band of caribou from Alaska's Teshekpuk Lake herd migrates across the vast coastal plain, traveling from calving grounds to windier areas where mosquitoes and bot flies are less likely to swarm. Protecting calving grounds, migration routes, and insect-relief areas is critical to the herd's health and survival.

Subhankar Banerjee

Snow geese with chicks. (Oil and the Geese series)

Subhankar Banerjee

Snow geese with their blue-gray young cross a tundra polygon, a common feature in the western Arctic's permafrost landscape.

Subhankar Banerjee

"Known and Unknown Tracks" (Oil and the Geese series)

Subhankar Banerjee

The Teshekpuk Lake Caribou Herd rests in the Pik Dunes, a unique expanse of desertlike sand south of their calving grounds. The dunes offer the caribou relief from insects, their most numerous and relentless "predators." After calving takes place, insect-relief areas become essential for caribou survival.

Subhankar Banerjee

Caribou tracks on tundra. (Coal and the Caribou series)